St. Louis pizzeria to open in renovated AT580 building

In a cross-post between nextSTL, UrbanCincy, and the Cincinnati Business Courier, Alex Ihnen reports on Pi Pizzeria‘s expansion into Cincinnati:

“We’ve been admiring the Cincinnati market for a few years now but just started our search about a year ago,” Pi co-owner Chris Sommers told nextSTL. “We are amazed at the resurgence of Downtown and OTR and had to be a part of it.” [...]

Sommers said they waited out the streetcar debate before committing to a Cincinnati location.

“We choose our locations based on major transit lines and feel the streetcar will be game-changing for Cincinnati,” Sommers told nextSTL.

Pi’s original St. Louis location is located in the transit-rich Delmar Loop. The downtown St. Louis Pi sits atop a MetroLink station, and the D.C. restaurant is near both Metro Center and Chinatown Stations.

Cincinnati Streetcar Construction (2014 Q1 Update)

Despite a brutally cold winter, significant progress was made on the construction of the Cincinnati Streetcar system. All of the straight track on Elm and Race Streets in Over-the-Rhine is now complete. Work has also begun on the short stretch of track on Central Parkway, the border between Over-the-Rhine and the Central Business District. Crews will soon begin to work on the “special” track work, including the curve from Race Street to Central Parkway. Work is also underway on two of the streetcar stops on Elm Street.

March 2014 Misc. Photos

What we can learn from millennials who opt out of driving

[Jeffrey Ball of The New Republic] notes that many millennials who go carless live in a handful of mostly coastal cities. Read one way, this shows that it is not a widespread phenomenon. Read another, it proves that transportation preferences are malleable. Most of those millennials grew up in car-dependent suburbs. They stopped driving when they moved to cities because they now live somewhere denser, with fewer incentives to drive and better alternatives. Offer that same deal to Americans in other places, especially the poor, and many of them would gladly take it.

Love of local brew fuels rapid rise of Cincy’s beer market

Soapbox covers the growth of craft breweries in Cincinnati:

“Knowing what I know now, I certainly would have done things a little bit different,” says [MadTree] owner Brady Duncan. “In our original business plan estimates, we underestimated it so much that our monthly estimate is now like an average Saturday night.” [...]

“We’re only in our eighth month, and we’re brewing right now at the rate we thought we’d be brewing about three and half to four years into the business,” says Rhinegeist co-founder Bob Bonder.

Tim Cook Rejects Conservative Group’s Politics, Suggests They Sell Apple’s Stock

What ensued was the only time I can recall seeing [Apple CEO] Tim Cook angry, and he categorically rejected the worldview behind the NCPPR’s advocacy. He said that there are many things Apple does because they are right and just, and that a return on investment (ROI) was not the primary consideration on such issues.

“When we work on making our devices accessible by the blind,” he said, “I don’t consider the bloody ROI.” He said that the same thing about environmental issues, worker safety, and other areas where Apple is a leader.

February 2014 Misc. Photos

January 2014 Misc. Photos

Applebee’s closes after history of health violations

The reactions from Goshen Township residents are priceless:

Carol Pullen, a Goshen Township resident, said she was “shocked” it closed.

Pullen last visited the Miami Township Applebee’s this summer where she received good food and good service.

“It was expensive, but anywhere is anymore,” she said.

Tom Altum, a Goshen Township resident, said he usually goes to the Cracker Barrel on River’s Edge Drive instead of Applebee’s when he eats out.

He hasn’t been to Applebee’s in “several years.”

The restaurant “got too loud,” Altum said.

Target Tests Small Store for Urban Shoppers as Young People Pick Cities Over Suburbs

The discount retailer, which has long focused on large stores in suburban markets, completed a lease last week on its smallest store yet, a 20,000-square-foot location in Minneapolis, a test store for a new format called TargetExpress. [...]

John D. Griffith, executive vice president for property development at Target, said that as more people, and especially young people, opted to live in cities rather than suburbs, Target wanted to remain convenient.

“Many of them grew up with a Target experience,” Mr. Griffith said. “Now, they show up at their cool little bungalow they’re redoing, they’re five miles from downtown, and yet, Target is a little bit of an effort to get to.”