Fix Electronic Device Rules or Face Legislation

As you surely know, the public is growing increasingly skeptical of prohibitions on the use of many electronic devices during the full duration of a flight, while at the same time using such devices in increasing numbers. For example, a traveler can read a paper copy of a newspaper throughout a flight, but is prohibited from reading the same newspaper for major portions of the flight when reading it on an e-reader. The fear of devices that operate on electricity is dated, at best. [...]

While safety and security must be the top priority in air travel, the FAA and other federal agencies should also work to ensure air travel is as hassle free as possible by revising or removing regulations that have become unnecessary or outdated. It is my hope that the FAA will work, with the FCC and other federal agencies where appropriate, as expeditiously as possible to implement common sense changes to todays restrictive regulations on in-flight use of PEDs that better reflect new technologies and the changing role these devices play in Americans daily lives. While the agency can and should use existing authorities to allow for the broader use of PEDs, I am prepared to pursue legislative solutions should progress be made too slowly.

U.S. Senator Claire McCaskill writing to FAA Administrator Michael Huerta regarding the use of electronic devices in the air

We’re living the dream; we just don’t realize it

We’re living the dream; we just don’t realize it

The one positive social trend that did generate a significant amount of coverage — the extraordinary drop in the U.S. crime rate since the mid-’90s — seems to have been roundly ignored by the general public. The violent crime rate (crimes per thousand people) dropped from 51 to 15 between 1995 and 2010, truly one of the most inspiring stories of societal progress in our lifetime. And yet according to a series of Gallup polls conducted over the past 10 years, more than two-thirds of Americans believe that crime has been getting worse, year after year.

CBS’s David Poltrack touts new golden age of broadcast TV

CBS’s David Poltrack touts new golden age of broadcast TV

Poltrack, who has been crunching numbers for CBS for decades, said new platforms such as digital streaming and video on demand are allowing the networks to increase their reach beyond the traditional television screen. The trick is getting accurate ratings for non-traditional viewers.

If that’s how they feel, then why are they the only major TV network that doesn’t allow streaming services like Hulu to access its full lineup of shows? CBS finally reached a deal with Hulu last month, but similar to the network’s deal with Netflix, it’s only for older shows like Star Trek, I Love Lucy, and The Twilight Zone.