Monthly Archives: April 2011

The Megabus Effect

The success of inter-city bus services (like Megabus) proves that high-speed rail is needed in the U.S. and would be quite successful:

Air travel, despite its enormous carbon footprint (and meager profitability), is unlikely to be displaced anytime soon as the transportation of choice for long-haul travel. For short distances, the car is still king. But of the most traveled American routes, many fall into this middle category: New York to D.C. (or Boston), Los Angeles to Las Vegas, Chicago to Detroit (or St. Louis), Dallas to Houston (or Austin or San Antonio), Miami to Orlando, Nashville to Atlanta (or Memphis). These routes are too far for a leisurely drive and too near for most Americans to justify the expense, or increasing hassle, of a plane…

In Europe, these are the routes owned by rail, and transit policy experts in the U.S. hope that in coming decades high-speed rail will serve that market. But it’s the intercity bus, the tortoise of the transport world, that is taking over much of the medium-haul market.

Where I've Been RecentlyiPhone keeps record of everywhere you go:

Security researchers have discovered that Apple’s iPhone keeps track of where you go – and saves every detail of it to a secret file on the device which is then copied to the owner’s computer when the two are synchronised.

The file contains the latitude and longitude of the phone’s recorded coordinates along with a timestamp, meaning that anyone who stole the phone or the computer could discover details about the owner’s movements using a simple program.

So, I downloaded the iPhone Tracker application, and here’s where I’ve been since last summer.

The sun is setting and it’s 80 degrees. 50,000 people are enjoying the music and views our city has to offer. The National just rocked the main stage at Yeatman’s Cove. The Flaming Lips are about to start their set on the main stage at Sawyer Point.

Bill Donabedian, describing his vision for Cincinnati’s Bunbury Music Festival

The Fetishization of Unhealthiness

Apparently concern for one’s health has become so mainstream that gratuitous disregard for it has become hip and counter-cultural.

Please note: I am not simply making the observation that many Americans have disgustingly unhealthy eating habits.  Rather, I find that such diets have become almost chic.  Last weekend, for example, I was with some friends at a pub (which shall remain nameless) whose menu included such delicacies as Spam Bites (deep-fried spam and cream cheese), Deep-Fried Pickles and Pie Bites (deep-fried bits of pie). […]

Bacon seems to be the icon of this counter-revolution.